808 Oahu Realtor (Ryan Riggins) License #RS-74740

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Crafting an Acceptable Offer

Table-250.jpg

An agent was presenting a contract to a single, senior woman who was moving into a retirement home. It was a full price offer with reasonable terms and timelines but the seller wouldn’t accept it. When the agent probed deeper, she discovered that the seller was concerned with her dining room table.

It had been the first piece of nice furniture that she and her husband had purchased and they had literally spent a lifetime celebrating and making decisions at that table. It troubled the owner to think that the table would go to strangers who might not appreciate it as much as her family had.

The agent told the elderly seller that she knew of a church nearby that had a community room filled with lovely tables like hers. If she liked the idea, the agent would call the church to see if they’d like to have it. Once a new home for the table was found, the sale of the home went smoothly.

Lower inventory and increased demand in certain price ranges have increased the frequency of multiple offers on the same home. Sellers are frequently faced with a decision dilemma on which offer to accept and the price may not be the most important factor.

Sellers generally need the equity from the sale of their home to purchase another one but they also don’t want to have to temporarily move if they’re not able to get into the home they’re purchasing. Flexible buyers have discovered the value in coordinating the sale and possession of the homes.

Sellers want to know when they make a decision on an offer, that the buyers will be able to perform as the contract is written. The more contingencies that can be eliminated or minimized, the more comfortable a seller will feel about the certainty that it will close according to schedule.

The buyer should be pre-approved with all verifications and credit reports having been done. Simply having a loan officer’s opinion is definitely not the same thing as a pre-approval.

There is a unique dynamic to every transaction because the parties are individuals with infinite priorities and values. The art of the deal takes place when these unique variables are considered to define a mutually acceptable offer involving price, terms and conditions. The role and experience of the agents contribute to the successful outcome.


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14 Plumbing Preventative and Maintenance Tips

Saw this great post and had to re post. I hope you find this just as helpful as I do.
Aloha

Plumbing emergencies can occur at any time, and they almost always occur suddenly and without warning. We’d all love to avoid plumbing problems at all costs, but life happens and it’s good to know a few plumbing maintenance basics. However, if it is out of your comfort level, or your bathroom/kitchen look like a war zone, call a local professional plumber who can manage the job for you.

Young plumber fixing a sink at kitchen.

If you’d like to try your hand at a few simple techniques, here are my favorite top preventive and maintenance tips. When it comes to plumbing, knowledge and prevention is much easier and less costly that repairs. Knowing what to do when a plumbing emergency arises will help minimize damage, costs, and frustration.

  1. Find your shut off valve. Water can be turned off from from inside and outside your house. It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with where both your…

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Seller Safety Plan

43997828_250pixel.jpgSeptember is REALTOR® Safety month when special attention is focused on the security of having a home on the market and the concerns for the well-being of owners is a day-to-day effort. The following list may help sellers secure their home and minimize risk.

  • Locks – doors and windows should be locked at all times. Additional locks like deadbolts or safety locks can provide a higher level of security.
  • Home lighting – turn on the lights prior to purchasers arriving to improve the showing. Not only will they be able to see things better, it could prevent them hurting themselves unnecessarily. Outdoor motion-sensor lights provide additional security.
  • Eliminate the possible hazards – try to identify anything that might cause a person to trip and fall such as loose objects on the floor or floor coverings that aren’t properly secured.
  • Security system – If you have a security system, it should be monitored and armed, especially when you’re away from home. Most systems will allow you to program a temporary code that agents will be able to use based on your instructions.
  • Prescription medications – remove or secure the drugs before showing the home.
  • Secure valuables – jewelry, artwork, gaming systems; mail containing personal information like bank and credit card statements, investment reports; wine and liquor can also be a security issue.
  • Remove family photos –pictures can be distracting to prospective purchasers but the concern at hand is to eliminate photos of a wife, teenage daughter or children that might provide information to a possible pedophile or stalker who could be posing as a buyer.
  • Remove weapons – the reason to remove guns should be obvious to everyone but a knife block on the kitchen counter can become an opportunity of convenience.
  • Unexpected callers – when some people see a for sale sign in the yard, they think that it’s an invitation to look at the home immediately. Keep your doors locked so that people can’t let themselves in. If they ring the doorbell and want to see the home but aren’t accompanied by an agent, ask them to call your listing agent.

These precautions should be taken before the photos or virtual tours are made. Having these items in plain sight in the pictures posted on the Internet can unwillingly provide prospective criminals with a menu of what is available.

Agents cannot protect a seller’s valuables other than to inform the owner of potential threats to their security. In most cases, the seller’s agent will not be present at home showings and even if they were, it is not always practical nor desirable to follow the buyers and their agent through the home.


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Annual Maintenance

home maintenance 250.jpgA common expectation of homeowners is to want the components and systems in their home to work when they need them. Periodic maintenance is just as important as having a trusted service provider to make necessary repairs.

Victims of Murphy’s Law can attest that their air conditioner goes out on the hottest day of the year or the water heater fails when you have out of town visitors.

If the convenience of having things work doesn’t justify maintaining your home’s systems, consider that it can be less expensive than the results of neglect causing repairs or replacement.

  • Replace burned-out, dim or missing bulbs in light fixtures and lamps. Consider switching to LED bulbs.
  • Dryer exhaust vents build up lint even though you may be cleaning the filter regularly.
  • Fire extinguishers need to be recharged or replaced after expiration date.
  • Establish a recurring appointment on your calendar to change filters in your HVAC.
  • Replace missing or damaged caulk around sinks, bathtubs, showers, windows and other areas.
  • Clean gutters.
  • Schedule an inspection with a pest control a minimum of once a year unless you have a service contract.
  • Schedule a chimney cleaning prior to using the fireplace for the first time in the season.
  • Keep all tree branches and shrubs trimmed away from the home.
  • Pressure wash exterior, deck, patio, sidewalks and driveway.
  • Keep levels of insulation in the attic above your ceiling joists.
  • Check appliances with water lines for leaks or worn hoses.
    • ice maker • washing machine • dishwasher • others
  • Test all GFI breakers and reset.
  • Inspect all electrical outlets for broken receptacles, fire hazards or loose fitting plugs.
  • Have furnace and air conditioner serviced annually.
  • Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and change batteries.

The early fall is a great time to take care of these items before the weather becomes harsh.


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PCS – Before and After arrival

You know when it comes to getting the correct info this is a great blog. Big Mahalo for sharing your info and your viewpoint on PCS here to Hawaii

PCS to Hawaii - a Military wife's Journey

We arrived in Honolulu on May 31 and I have a lot to share.  I’m going to start with the flight and finish up with what I’ve learned so far about  temporary lodging allowance (TLA), entitlements and reimbursements.

As I posted in my previous blog, animals traveling between May 15 and September 15 will need to be shipped as cargo.  Because of this, we had to be at Air Cargo 2 1/2 hours before our flight left.  We had a rental car since we shipped our POV out the day before we left.  We had intended to use curbside check in for our luggage, but when we tried, we were told by the Sky Valet that unless we checked our bags at the ticket counter, we would incur extra baggage fees even though we were allowed 4 checked bags each since we were traveling on orders.  I’m going to spare…

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PCS to Hawaii?

It seems so many military families are PCS’ing to Hawaii . It is because of this, that even though I absolutely hate this place that I feel it important to discuss some of the most important questions in relation to coming here. Throughout the months I have been listening and watching the Army Wife 101 fan page and I have compiled many of your questions for these types of posts. I hope you find it helpful.

In this post I will discuss questions in relation to housing and living offpost.

How long is the waiting list for housing onpost?

As I always tell spouses never ask another spouse that only because the wait time varies greatly. You will hear stories of people who PCS’ed here and within a a week they had housing. Then you will hear from those who moved here and lived in lodging for 2 -3 months. Your best bet is to call the housing office and they can give you a round about estimate. You can be placed on something close to a waiting list. When you arrive you will jump ahead of those who have NOT arrived on island yet.  As of the time this post was written you can call the main housing office at 877-487-4323 or visit their site at http://www.islandpalmcommunities.com

Where will I stay while I am waiting for housing?

This is a common question and in my experience I’ve learned you will hear various answers. The first place you definitely want to contact is Schofield Lodging. You can visit them atwww.innatschofield.com. The way it goes is that you need to contact them first and see if they have space available, if they don’t then they will issue you a statement of nonavailability and you will usually wind up at a hotel close to Honolulu Airport. You will hear some people say that they went and stayed at the freaking Ritz Carlton or the Hilton Hawaiian and the Army paid for it. My advice, do it the proper way this way you are guaranteed to receive your TLA and have no issues. PCS’ing to Hawaii is not the time to play around financially.

What does housing look like on Schofield?

Fortunately for me I live in new housing and I will post a few pictures of that below.  Unfortunately you have a great chance of being put in what they call “New Old Housing” which is not that bad in comparison to the old stuff that let’s just say you have to see it for yourself. Housing can also place you in what is known as military reservations. Wheeler is Schofield’s airfield and is right outisde the main gate. They have very new housing and extremely old housing. Let me just say when I say old housing I am talking about Pearl Harbor Era. Some of the housing on Wheeler are considered of historical value and cannot be torn down. At that point they try to revamp the inside but their is only so much revamping you can do to a house that old.

Helemano Military Reservation is about 15 minutes from post near the North Shore. I hear mixed reviews on it but personally Schofield is far enough , I wouldn’t want to be even further at Helemano. The other place they can place you at is AMR. I have friends who live there and they have new housing but there is old housing there as well. AMR is very hilly and high up , but the good thing is you are right near Honolulu . It seems like you have to go to Honolulu to have any kind of life here. Keep in mind in Hawaii military can live in any branches housing, but there are always stipulations on everything . For instance Army can live in Navy housing but they might not be able to get new navy housing.

Many wives ask me what housing areas on Schofield they should ask about when at the housing office. I always say Kaena, Porter, Moyer and Kalakua. Those are the newest housing areas to my knowledge.

Here are a few pictures of a new 3 bedroom home on Schofield in Kaena (my home)

You can view more here if you have Facebook

Do I keep my BAH when I live onpost?

Uh No…I wish! Now when I first arrived here, there was some pretty crappy housing that they actually were giving some onpost residents 15% of their BAH back. Generally speaking your BAH is taken out of your check and that’s that. if you live offpost you get to keep your BAH and utilize it as you wish for a mortgage or rent and possibly utilities.

Do we pay utilities onpost?

You can read my previous post about Mock Light Billing here.

In regards to other utilities it’s the same as any other post. You pay for your cable and phone. Water is free  I wonder for how long.

Who takes care of the lawn maintenance onpost?

I am still trying to figure that out myself because since my husband has returned from his deployment we have cut our own yard, Yet and still we see the landscaping guys in our backyard and cutting our bushes.

Best places to live offpost?

If had to live offpost the 4 places I would look into are Mililani, Ewa Beach, Pearl City, and Kapolei. If you wanna know about the site . Read my post about Offpost Housing. I know many people are quick to want to live off post but please be aware Hawaii is very expensive. I know because we looked and I gladly would take on post housing considering the prices, and the utility cost I have heard about here.

See there look at how fair I was and I didn’t even talk about how much I hate it here 🙂

I think I just about covered all the common housing questions. If I missed one feel free to share it in the comments section.

Thank you Army Wife 101 for this awesome post.


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Money Down the Drain

iStock_000012313013Small200.jpgPrivate mortgage insurance is necessary for buyers who don’t have or choose not to put 20% or more down payment when they purchase a home. It is required for high loan-to-value mortgages and it provides an opportunity for many people to get into a home who otherwise would not be able.

The problem is that it is expensive and a homeowner’s goal should be to eliminate it as soon as possible to lower their monthly payment and avoid putting good money down the drain.

FHA loans made after 6/1/13 that have 90% or higher loan-to-value at time of purchase have mortgage insurance premium for the life of the loan. FHA loans made prior to 6/1/13, can have the MIP removed after five years and if the unpaid balance is 78% or less than the original loan-to-value.

VA loans do not require mortgage insurance.

Conventional loans, in most cases, with higher than 80% loan-to-value require mortgage insurance. The cost of that insurance varies but with a $250,000 mortgage, it could easily be between $100 and $200 a month.

Your monthly mortgage statement should itemize what your monthly fee is for the mortgage insurance. Unlike interest that is deductible, most homeowners are not able to deduct mortgage insurance premiums.

If you plan to remain in the home or to stay there for a considerable number of years, the solution may be to refinance the home. If the home has increased since it was purchased, the loan-to-value at its new appraised value may not require PMI. You might even be fortunate enough to obtain a lower rate than you currently have.